Friday, December 19, 2014

Consolation

Every time I lose a session, I look for a silver lining. Sometimes, it's easy to find one. Other times, as with last night's session, not so much. The best one I can come up with for last night's session is that I was net positive on my all ins. Here are the numbers:

     -5174 3d 3s hand  65
      9927 Qc Kh hand 115
      5525 6s 2d hand 124


I have a hankering to play an 8-game sit and go tonight, so that's just what I'm going to do :-)

During current Hold'em session you were dealt 127 hands and saw flop:
 - 17 out of 20 times while in big blind (85%)
 - 12 out of 18 times while in small blind (66%)
 - 55 out of 89 times in other positions (61%)
 - a total of 84 out of 127 (66%)
 Pots won at showdown - 9 of 24 (37%)
 Pots won without showdown - 12

delta: $-91,515
cash game no limit hold'em balance: $6,598,331
balance: $9,503,430

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Aces cracked and mended

Last night, on the penultimate hand of the session, I had my seventh most lucrative cash game no limit hold'em hand ever. I was dealt pocket rockets, and went all in pre flop with them. I'm pretty sure my aces were cracked on the flop, then mended on the river. The flop had two queens in it, and I felt sure one of the three opponents who called me had a queen. Luckily for me, I spiked an ace on the river for a full house, aces full of queens. Let me check the archives to see if my foreboding was justified ... As it turns out, it wasn't; none of my opponents had a queen, so I didn't need to spike an ace to win the monster pot of $155,132. In reality my aces were neither cracked nor mended. Still, it makes for a good blog post title :-)

During current Hold'em session you were dealt 56 hands and saw flop:
 - 9 out of 13 times while in big blind (69%)
 - 4 out of 10 times while in small blind (40%)
 - 15 out of 33 times in other positions (45%)
 - a total of 28 out of 56 (50%)
 Pots won at showdown - 2 of 8 (25%)
 Pots won without showdown - 2

delta: $54,632
cash game no limit hold'em balance: $6,689,846
balance: $9,594,945

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Getting it in good

I've used this blog post title before, but it's good enough to use again :-) In poker, you always want to get your money in good. Essentially, that means getting it in when you're a big favorite. Now that I have a "did it float?" utility, my modified definition of getting it in good means that the decision to put all your chips in floated, i.e., had a net positive long term return on investment. You don't always have to go all in to be able to answer the "did it float?" question, although that's the most usual case. The other case is when another player, who you have covered, goes all in, and you call. The key component of being able to answer the "did it float?" question is that the decision point where you're asking the question was your last decision of the hand.

Last night, my three biggest hands in terms of the absolute values of the deltas were all losses. In all three, the "did it float?" question applied. Here are the numbers:

558000 (2758000 2200000)
504152 (1903676 1399524)
-951920 (1600000 2551920)


What this boils down to is that I got the money in good in two of the three hands. If I'd won those two hands, I still would have lost money on the night, but it would have been a lot less than I actually lost - only $20,092, instead of $102,164. So that means I was actually playing pretty well for playing so shittily :-) Poker's like that sometimes.

During current Hold'em session you were dealt 128 hands and saw flop:
 - 18 out of 21 times while in big blind (85%)
 - 8 out of 20 times while in small blind (40%)
 - 42 out of 87 times in other positions (48%)
 - a total of 68 out of 128 (53%)
 Pots won at showdown - 7 of 16 (43%)
 Pots won without showdown - 9

delta: $-102,164
cash game no limit hold'em balance: $6,635,214
balance: $9,540,313

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Double stealth double up

The poker hands where much money is both won and lost are the ones where multiple players have the flop hit their hands hard. One common way this can happen is what I call double stealth. That's when two players have stealth hands. By definition, no pair appears in the flop when there's a stealth hand. Stealth hands are wired in to the board. There are several double stealth scenarios. Here are two of the most common:

1. both players have a stealth two pair
2. one player has a stealth two pair and the other player has a set

A set, by definition, is a stealth hand. It's non-stealth cousin is called trips :-) Last night, double stealth arose on hand 20. I'd been dealt 5h 5c, and the flop came 7d 5d Th. I went all in, and actually got a caller. He'd been dealt 7c Tc, so he had a stealth two pair. My set held up, and I won a pot worth $103,504, $51,752 of which was o.p.m. (other people's money). That gave me the freedom to play a lot longer if I wanted, and still be assured of a profit on the night. I decided not to play that many more hands.

During current Hold'em session you were dealt 29 hands and saw flop:
 - 5 out of 5 times while in big blind (100%)
 - 3 out of 5 times while in small blind (60%)
 - 13 out of 19 times in other positions (68%)
 - a total of 21 out of 29 (72%)
 Pots won at showdown - 3 of 3 (100%)
 Pots won without showdown - 7

delta: $51,008
cash game no limit hold'em balance: $6,737,378
balance: $9,642,477

Monday, December 15, 2014

10 New York minutes

On Saturday night, I set a new personal best for futility. In just eight hands, I lost $150,000. The whole process took just over eight minutes - in other words, 10 New York minutes :-) I've only lost more money in a single session of cash game no limit hold'em once, and I've never lost that much money that fast. Here are the hands I was dealt, along with the hand deltas:

As Jc      $3,275
Jd Jc     $-4,000
8s 4s       $-500
Kh Kd    $-35,000
Ks Kc    $-13,775
9h Kh        $630
Js Kd    $-50,630
Jc Kh    $-50,000


I hit the felt at the end of hands 5, 7, and 8. On hand 8, I was a 95.45% favorite after the turn, but my opponent hit a 2 outer on the river. Whatcha gonna do? :-)

During current Hold'em session you were dealt 8 hands and saw flop:
 - 1 out of 1 times while in big blind (100%)
 - 0 out of 0 times while in small blind (0%)
 - 7 out of 7 times in other positions (100%)
 - a total of 8 out of 8 (100%)
 Pots won at showdown - 2 of 7 (28%)
 Pots won without showdown - 0

delta: $-150,000
cash game no limit hold'em balance: $6,686,370
balance: $9,591,469

Saturday, December 13, 2014

The cruelest hand

Last night, I suffered the cruelest hand of my career. At least, it was the cruelest I can remember. The cruelty of a cruel hand has nothing to do with how much you lose on it; rather, it has to do with the false hope it instills in you, and the irony that it is that false hope alone which causes you to lose your money. Of course, it adds to the pathos if you happen to hit the felt on the hand, and also if you happen to lose a good amount of money on it. The icing on the cake is if you use both your hole cards and the river card to make your best hand. The more wired in you are to the board, the less likely it is for an opponent to be wired in harder. All of these factors were true in the final hand of last night's session. I was dealt Ts Qh. The flop came 9c 6s 6h. The turn was the jack of spades. The river was the king of hearts. So, as you can see, I "got there" on the river; I made a king high straight. It was the higher of the two possible straights I could have made on the river. Since I was using both my hole cards, and neither of them was the low card of the straight, there was no straight that could beat me. Since the board didn't have three cards to a flush, my hand couldn't be beaten by a flush. The only hands that could beat me were a full house or a four of a kind. The fact that the river card delivered me my straight made it less likely that it also delivered my opponent a full house. And yet, that's precisely what happened. My opponent turned over Ks 6c, and won a pot worth $71,486 with a full house, sixes full of kings. I lost $35,118 on the hand, hit the felt, and quit for the night. That was the second time I'd hit the felt in the session. I know when I'm not wanted :-)

During current Hold'em session you were dealt 64 hands and saw flop:
 - 6 out of 8 times while in big blind (75%)
 - 6 out of 8 times while in small blind (75%)
 - 25 out of 48 times in other positions (52%)
 - a total of 37 out of 64 (57%)
 Pots won at showdown - 3 of 8 (37%)
 Pots won without showdown - 3

delta: $-100,000
cash game no limit hold'em balance: $6,836,370
balance: $9,741,469

Friday, December 12, 2014

Pocks and freqs

I want to talk a little bit about pocks and freqs. Pocks are pocket pairs. Freqs are frequencies of occurrence. Every pock has a freq of 221. That is to say, every pocket pair occurs, on average, once every 221 hands. Since the vast majority of the sessions I play are less than 221 hands in length, that means that it's generally more like than not that any particular pocket pair will not occur in a session. Last night, a freq-y thing happened :-) I got pocket fours multiple times. Four times, in fact! That turns out to be 6.41 times as frequently as they should have occurred. I was aware that fours kept coming up, but only remember them coming up three times. The fourth time was the charm. I flopped a set, ended up going all in, and won a side pot worth $50,708 and a main pot worth $74,882. It was the most lucrative pocket fours hand of my career by far, and my 14th most lucrative pocket pair.

During current Hold'em session you were dealt 138 hands and saw flop:
 - 15 out of 18 times while in big blind (83%)
 - 6 out of 15 times while in small blind (40%)
 - 62 out of 105 times in other positions (59%)
 - a total of 83 out of 138 (60%)
 Pots won at showdown - 9 of 17 (52%)
 Pots won without showdown - 11

delta: $25,590
cash game no limit hold'em balance: $6,936,370
balance: $9,841,469